Let’s Geek Out!

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/Mazda3-pi.jpg

Hai frens!

I hope you don’t mind me calling you frens but, come on, we spent quite some time together, in world SL and on this bloggo and my stupid YouTube channel too. So you know me quite well I guess. There’s not much to hide, I’m basically the same ol’ bish offline, in my 1st life as I am online, in Second Life and on this blog. With Orca you get what you pay for. Deal with it!

 

But who are you? I know quite a lot of you lovelies from Second Life, yes, at least your overly sexified avatars, but more and more new readers come from other worlds. Be it the Linux community or just plain – boring – bloggers, I don’t know the first thing about you.

And that ain’t a bad thing! Privacy is important and should be honoured and I’m doing my best to avoid giving my data to some megalomaniac internet spy machine like Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Apple and such hostiles. But nevertheless am I curious to know who my readers are. Not to sell you shitty products or sell your data to the highest bidder but just for curiosity’s sake.

 

As you know the geek is strong in me. For a female that is. And that’s why I’m most interested in your hardware setups. Because I believe the hardware you use tells a lot about yourself and your personality. I got this clue when I stumbled upon this website: https://linuxrig.com/the-linux-setup/ Quite telling to learn that the editor of OMG! Ubuntu! doesn’t even use Ubuntu but Arch, don’t you think? It’s reassuring that some people in the Ubuntu community have good taste and also that one can use ArchLinux as a professional system.

But he uses a better Linux!

Hmmm, now I don’t expect you all rocking fancy Linuxy computers so let me adjust the catalogue of questions  a little bit:

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?
  2. Why do you use Linux your chosen OS?
  3. (What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?)
  4. (What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?)
  5. What one piece of Linux software do you depend upon?
  6. Why is it so important?
  7. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?
  8. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?
  9. Will you show us a photo of your physical setup?

Okay, we see already questions 3 and 4 are only applicable to Linux users, so the rest of you idiots may ignore those. 🙂 Still show me your systems inside and out, and with some good luck – and your friendly permission – I will publish the results of the questionaire and photos here in this fancy bloggo! \o/ Cool, eh? \o/

 

10 comments

  1. Who are you, and what do you do? Jay, writer, therapist
    Why do you use Linux your chosen OS? OS? Is that a thing I should understand?
    (What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?) do not understand the question
    (What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?) do not understand the question
    What one piece of Linux software do you depend upon? n/a
    Why is it so important? n/a
    What kind of hardware do you run this setup on? do not understand the question
    Will you share a screenshot of your desktop? i’m sure i have no idea how
    Will you show us a photo of your physical setup? do not understand the question

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thx very much Jay for this insightful insight into your lamblike psyche. ^.^ You were the first bold responder, hopefully not the last. I so wish more readers would come out of their snail shells. Hey, afterall this is a little, very little, private blog, we’re among friends here.

      I gather you’re a female computer user, treating your laptop (you would never put a tower on your dedicated workdesk – or have a dedicated workdesk in the first place) like household appliances, maybe fashion accessoires, you don’t much care about. But they make you look fancy when entering the press screening with a chic little netbook in your purse. You never opened/upgraded your machine, added some horsepower or cleaned out the dustbunnies. You use Windows or MacOS. And you use your OS as it came preinstalled from the mailorder store … most likely from down the Amazonas river.

      That about correct?

      Oh btw, making a snapshot of your screen (your workshop toolset) should be easypeasy. In Linux I just press the Print key, voila. 😉 I see no reason why Microsoft/Apple shouldn’t give you that option to use an otherwise outdated, needlessly spacewasting key.
      Some screenshots off of Orca’s desktop:
      https://orcaflotta.blog/2019/10/11/why-you-should-use-manjaro/

      For shots of your setup you use your smartphone or a real camera.
      Like so for example: https://orcaflotta.blog/2019/06/22/bravo-one-orcablog-reader-shows-their-setup/

      If your setup consists solely of a Macbook, carelessly but stylishly thrown on the chaise longue, well, I find that interesting too. 😉

      xoxo

      Like

  2. I’m a converted yank bish and ardent brit now, who will enjoy watching england smash SA out of the park in the rugby world cup that’s about to i kick off smiles Luv ya orcs xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve had 3 to 5 computers around for about 20 years – piddling with them and/or upgrading them. This is the first year that all of them are basically new, newly built and/or newly upgraded. My Computers 2019:

    1) Ace the Laptop: Acer Aspire 3, 15.6″ Full HD, AMD A9-9420, 8GB DDR4 … took out the 1TB noisy 2 ½” HDD that came with it and replaced it with a 240GB SSD. WIN10 and Ubuntu 18.04.3 share that SSD (*NOT* “Alongside”). Used mainly as a portable, and to test ‘Live’ USB Linux Distros on new hardware recognition. $278 from Walmart.

    2) InWin (name most of my computers by cases used for building): 1rst (probably the last) Small Form Factor with an InWin Mini-ITX case, ASUS PRIME H310I-PLUS mini-ITX MoBo, a pair of 8GB sticks of memory for a total of 16GBs, 120 GB SSD, and now the Celeron G4900 from the Rose build (switched processors with Rose). Ended up being an expensive experimental build of the small forms, and just too small for me – especially since Ace the Laptop easily handles all the small form factor type of tests, and it has own display & totally portable. Cost was around $403 originally; however, as mentioned earlier, swapping that i3-8100 out for the $50+- Celeron G4900 reduced that cost to around $316. Has a 120GB SSD Windows 10 Pro drive – another less than $12 OEM license purchased from URcdkey, and easily activated by Microsoft … have purchased and activated 5 of those OEM licenses, with never a problem. (Note: Even the poor in America can have expensive hobbies)

    3) Rose: A $20 Rosewill case with GIGABYTE H310M A LGA 1151 (300 Series) Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, a i3-8100 3.6 GHz Quad processor (*moved from InWin Small Form build*), 16GB DDR4 2400 (2×8), a 450W Power Supply 80 PLUS Bronze, DVD Burner and a Rosewill RXC525-2B, 2 Port 2.5” & 3.5” SATA HDD/Mobile Rack for 5.25” Bay Tray (noisy fan but not noticeable when computer is kept at a distance). Built earlier this year as my main Linux testing machine – did a great job. However, after my recent build/upgrade moves, it is now a 2nd Linux test machine. Original cost was around $345 with the Celeron G4900, but swapped that $50+- CPU for InWin’s $137 i3-8100…cost at about $432 after that CPU swap. Has a 120GB SSD Windows 10 Pro drive (a less than $12 OEM license purchased from URcdkey, and easily activated by Microsoft) … I use a full USB install of Ubuntu 18.04.3 and a ‘Live’ USB with Persistent Storage of Ubuntu 19.10 on Rose, as well as occasionally using the Antec Sr. Ubuntu SSD in it – Linux Distros can be used in other computers (usually w/o problems).

    4) Antec Sr.: Case is from a 2006 build – an Antec NSK6000 that I have recently added a power supply from a 2016 build…from that same 2016 build I also moved the Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor plus a Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3P Motherboard, plus 32GB’s memory, CPU cooler – *ALL* intact and into the old Antec case, and in an open exterior 5.25” bay a USB 3.0 Front Panel 2 Port was added (now two 2.0 and two 3.0 USB ports on front). It also has two Hot Swap bays and a DVD-Rom. It is now my main Linux test machine. Original cost of that i5-6600K with Z170 MoBo was $267…just the CPU is now listed at $222 on Amazon, so that value remains steady even after 3 years. The 32 GBs of memory was $145 back then, and is a lot more now on Amazon. Basically, moving that entire CPU/MoBo/memory/CPU cooler/power supply into Antec Sr. was an upgrade value of at least $400-450 (one of the reason I have spent heavily on the Antec Jr. build). Have 120GB SSD Windows 10 Pro drive (a less than $12 OEM license purchased from URcdkey, and easily activated by Microsoft) and another 120GB SSD with Ubuntu 18.04.3 on that drive, and I use a Hot Swap SATA bay to swap the OSes. Remove both OSes when testing various Linux Distros.

    5) Antec Jr.: Antec Sonata Proto case from a 2016 build…stripped power supply and entire intact MoBo, memory, cooler and CPU and moved them into Antec Sr. (see #4 above). I consider it a new build using an old 2016 case, added 650W power supply, a XPG SX6000 Pro 256GB PCIe 3D NAND PCIe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 NVMe 1.3 R/W up to 2100/1500MB/s SSD (first one for me), a Gigabyte Z390 UD MoBo, Intel i9 9900 CPU – 65W version, 32GB memory kit, GeForce 1660 GPU … kept a couple of Hot Swap SATA bays from earlier build in the case, as well as the DVD-Rom. Left two SSDs in the case also – one a 512GB that is used for 1-backup image and Data – the other a 128 GB used for 1-backup image and misc temp data. Cost to build that was about $1,055. Main computer with only Windows 10 Pro on it – a less than $12 OEM license purchased from URcdkey, and easily activated by Microsoft. Have tested Ubuntu 18.04 and 19.10 USB’s on it – would never try any other Linux Distros tho.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s an impressive array of computing machines, Karmi. They all got their own screens/keyboards/mice or do they have to share? I guess I’ll swap my ITX board for a regular ATX – if I can find a 1150 mobo – and change to a bigger case size. As long as it’s not taller than 30 cm all will be cool.
      Thx for writing in. Next time send some pics … or show in your blog.

      Like

    • “have purchased and activated 5 of those OEM licenses, with never a problem. (Note: Even the poor in America can have expensive hobbies)”

      Without those 5 licenses it would’ve been even cheaper. 😉

      But anyhoo by the steadily rising connection prices, racketeering ISPs and Ajit Pai’s FCC having everything else in mind than protecting you, even using a cheap computer on the internet will soon be out of reach for the poor exploited masses of phuked over Americans.

      Like

  4. Yeah, that’s a small case – too small for a standard size power supply plus a microATX board (9.6 x 9.6). My InWin case is less that 9.5” on its stand, so required a special power supply that provides only 150W. 150W doesn’t run much and is still expensive…probably hard to find also. How much is enough power?

    Power Supply – “A power supply that doesn’t provide reliable or clean power can cause any number of problems, including instability that can be hard to pin down. In fact, a failing power supply can often cause other problems such as random resets and freezes that can otherwise remain mysterious.”

    Liked by 1 person

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